History

The signing of the Brunot Agreement in 1874 saw a flurry of settlement activity in La Plata County, and in 1876 the Colorado Territory became a state. 1878 brought the establishment of the Pine River Stage Station, which aided in the settlement of the Pine River Valley.

 

 

Chief Buckskin Charley was a noted character in the Pine River Valley, and was born around 1840 becoming Chief Sapiah of the Capote band of the Ute tribe from 1880 until his death in 1936. He learned English and took the name Charles Buck, but was best known as Buckskin Charley. Along with several other noted accomplishments, he succeeded Chief Ouray as official treaty negotiator.

In 1890 he was given the Rutherford Hayes Indian Peace Medal by President Benjamin Harrison. He rode with Geronimo as well as several other well-known chiefs in Theodore Roosevelt’s 1905 Inaugural Parade, and led the rescue of women and children who were abducted in the Meeker massacre. His son Antonio Buck Sr., succeeded him as hereditary chief and became the first elected chairman of the Southern Ute tribe.

 

 

Granite Peaks Ranch was built in the Pine River Valley in the early 1890’s by General William J. Palmer and John Porter, and has a very unique history all its own. Although not as much is mentioned about John Porter as was General Palmer, Porter was himself an entrepreneur that boosted the RGS payload via the coal from his mines located west of Durango.

 

 

Today Granite Peaks Ranch is comprised of approximately 565 acres, several cabins, barns, and outbuildings, as well as wildlife including elk, moose, big horned sheep, bears, mountain lions, and numerous smaller animals and fish. Granite Peaks may have less acreage than originally purchased, but its goals and purpose have grown significantly throughout history.

History

The signing of the Brunot Agreement in 1874 saw a flurry of settlement activity in La Plata County, and in 1876 the Colorado Territory became a state. 1878 brought the establishment of the Pine River Stage Station, which aided in the settlement of the Pine River Valley.

 

 

Chief Buckskin Charley was a noted character in the Pine River Valley, and was born around 1840 becoming Chief Sapiah of the Capote band of the Ute tribe from 1880 until his death in 1936. He learned English and took the name Charles Buck, but was best known as Buckskin Charley. Along with several other noted accomplishments, he succeeded Chief Ouray as official treaty negotiator.

In 1890 he was given the Rutherford Hayes Indian Peace Medal by President Benjamin Harrison. He rode with Geronimo as well as several other well-known chiefs in Theodore Roosevelt’s 1905 Inaugural Parade, and led the rescue of women and children who were abducted in the Meeker massacre. His son Antonio Buck Sr., succeeded him as hereditary chief and became the first elected chairman of the Southern Ute tribe.

 

 

Granite Peaks Ranch was built in the Pine River Valley in the early 1890’s by General William J. Palmer and John Porter, and has a very unique history all its own. Although not as much is mentioned about John Porter as was General Palmer, Porter was himself an entrepreneur that boosted the RGS payload via the coal from his mines located west of Durango.

Chief Sapiah of the Capote band of the Ute tribe was a noted character in the Pine River Valley, and was born around 1840. He learned English and took the name Charles Buck, but was best known as Buckskin Charley. Along with several other noted accomplishments, he succeeded Chief Ouray as official treaty negotiator.

 

 

Today Granite Peaks Ranch is comprised of approximately 565 acres, several cabins, barns, and outbuildings, as well as wildlife including elk, moose, big horned sheep, bears, mountain lions, and numerous smaller animals and fish. Granite Peaks may have less acreage than originally purchased, but its goals and purpose have grown significantly throughout history.

granite peak ranch partners